The IT industry is practicing what it preaches when it comes to flexible working with the sector one of the most advanced in giving staff the freedom to produce the goods outside of the office.

What is clearly known and appreciated by tech firms is something that more employers are starting to understand as they undergo digital transformation processes that give staff the chance to exploit more flexibility.

The findings of some research from recruitment players Hydrogen and My Family Care found that in the world of IT there were more staff working remotely and taking advantage of a flexible start and finish time.

The average number of employers offering flexibility is 66% but in the tech world it shoots up to 81% with a recognition that allowing home working is one of the criteria that prospective staff look for when choosing an employer.

The positive for the channel is that with most of them having a good grasp of the benefits of flexible working they are in a prime position to advise customers on what steps to take to copy their example.

Ben Black, Director of My Family Care, which works with employers to try and get a good work/life balance, said that the tech sector was leading the way.

“Thanks to the nature of their work and the ever-increasing development of technology, those who work in tech are able to work remotely and flexibly which is a fantastic way to improve your work/life balance and ensure your staff are engaged. The top benefit was revealed as being able to spend more time with family or a partner, closely followed by increased productivity – highlighting that it really is a win-win situation for both employer and employee," he said.

But there are also challenges and with skills such an issue those in the channel providing flexible working need to shout a little bit more loudly about it to try and tempt new recruits.

“Despite the fact that many tech companies enable their staff to work flexibly, it’s actually quite rare that they want to advertise this when they’re hiring which means they’re really missing a trick. We find that the onus tends to be on the job seeker to ask about flexible working practices, rather than the employer actively promoting it which could of course set them apart from one of their competitors in the battle for talent," said Richard Stevenson, manager of the technology practice at Hydrogen.

"While the tech sector is clearly leading the way when it comes to flexible working, there is still so much employers can do to really fully benefit," he added.