President Yoweri Museveni, Uganda leader since 1986 has promoted his eldest son to become a special presidential adviser in a reshuffle of army commanders.
The BBC reports that Maj Gen Muhoozi Kainerugaba has risen rapidly within the military, fuelling speculation that he is being groomed to become president one day.
Analysts say his new role, working more closely with state house, will broaden his remit and experience.
Mr Museveni, 72, is one of Africa’s longest-serving leaders.
He came to power in 1986 after winning a five-year guerrilla war – and last year won his fifth term in office with more than 60% of the vote.
Gen Kainerugaba, 42, had been in charge of the Special Forces in charge of his father’s security since 2008.
He graduated from the UK’s Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in 2000 and last year was promoted from brigadier to major general.
“Muhoozi… is going to play a significant role in a post-Museveni Uganda, there’s no doubt about it,” political commentator and rights activist Nicholas Opiyo told the Reuters news agency.
“He is just giving the boy a hand in experiencing how government works on the side of politics.”
Museveni is not the only African leader turning governance a family affair. In Equatorial Guinea, President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo who has governed the small country since 1979, has appointed his son,Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue as vice-president.
In Angola, President Eduardo dos Santos appointed his daughter Isabel as the CEO of the country’s state owned oil firm, SONANGOL.